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Reported Elsewhere

B.C. nurse hit with precedent-setting fine for financially exploiting elderly couple
(via The Vancouver Sun)

The College of Registered Nurses of B.C. says a precedent-setting penalty to a nurse who financially exploited an elderly couple should serve as a deterrent to others thinking about enriching themselves at the expense of patients in their care.

Today

B.C. challenging Alberta’s ban on B.C. wines through CFTA’s dispute settlement process
(via The Indo-Canadian Voice)

Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology Bruce Ralston announced on Monday that the B.C. government is formally challenging Alberta’s ban on B.C. wines through the Canadian Free Trade Agreement’s (CFTA) dispute settlement process.

Today

B.C.’s solitary confinement ruling to be appealed by Ottawa
(via Toronto Star)

B.C. had struck down Canada’s law on indefinite solitary confinement, arguing it needs clarity on the issue from the courts.

Today

Liberals look at creating use-it-or-lose-it leave for fathers, Trudeau says
(via CBC News)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said making it easier for non-birthing parents, like fathers, to take time off to care for a newborn would help remove barriers women face in the workforce related to expectations that they be primarily responsible for child-rearing.

Today

Former reporter wishes her 1980s Parliament Hill sexual harassment story was irrelevant today
(via National Newswatch)

On the floor of the House of Commons, they were snickering and chortling as a New Democrat MP mentioned a newspaper story about how the press secretary to the prime minister had told a female reporter she would get her interview once she agreed to a date.

Today

‘I’m just more afraid of climate change than I am of prison’
(via The New York Times)

How a group of five activists called the Valve Turners decided to fight global warming by doing whatever it takes.

Today

Looking for Donald Trump in all the wrong places
(via Toronto Star)

Michael Lewis, the author of ‘Moneyball’ and ‘The Big Short,’ headed to the White House to query the U.S. president, but wound up on Steve Bannon’s couch.

Today

DNA secrets of how vampire bats became bloodthirsty
(via BBC News)

Eek eek! DNA analysis is giving clues to how the vampire bat can survive on blood alone.

Today

B.C. entitled to appeal ruling letting Trans Mountain avoid Burnaby bylaws: Horgan
(via Global News)

B.C. Premier John Horgan is defending his government’s plans to challenge a National Energy Board (NEB) ruling that will allow the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion to ignore a pair of Burnaby bylaws.

Yesterday

B.C. vows crackdown after Globe investigation reveals money-laundering scheme
(via The Globe and Mail)

Through millions of dollars in private lending and mortgages, people connected to the fentanyl trade are parking their illicit gains in the Vancouver-area property market – and using alleged threats, extortion and deception to make sure they get their money back.

Yesterday

B.C. mom whose two sons overdosed urges doctors to check prescription history
(via Yahoo! News)

Helen Jennens says the deaths of her sons, Rian Leinweber in August 2011 and Tyler Leinweber in January 2016, could have been prevented if doctors had checked their drug histories on B.C.'s unique real-time database PharmaNet.

Yesterday

Trade war rhetoric heats up as Alberta files objection to $1.4-billion North Montney Mainline
(via Alaska Highway News)

The Alberta government has filed its objection over TransCanada's $1.4-billion North Montney Mainline project, though both it and the B.C. government say the move has nothing to do with the current Trans Mountain dispute between the two provinces.

Yesterday

Trudeau's vow on Indigenous rights is 'long time coming,' says royal commission co-chair
(via Cross Country Checkup)

When the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP) released its final report in 1996, it set out a 20-year roadmap for making changes to better the lives of Indigenous people in this country. No surprise, then, that the co-chair of RCAP, Georges Erasmus, was watching closely this week when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said his government intended to renew the relationship between Canada and Indigenous peoples by fully recognizing Indigenous rights.

Yesterday

Former Ontario PC leader says he grew the party, so he should get to lead it
(via National Newswatch)

The former leader of Ontario's Progressive Conservatives said Sunday he helped grow the party to unprecedented levels, so he should be the one to lead it into the upcoming election.

Yesterday

'No place' for racism in justice system, minister says
(via CTV News)

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said that people “marching in the streets” after Gerald Stanley’s acquittal in the death of 22-year-old Cree man Colton Boushie demonstrated that people are concerned with the current state of Canadian courts.

Yesterday

Russia Dagestan shooting: Five women killed in attack on churchgoers
(via BBC News)

Five women have been killed in a shooting at a Christian church in Russia's volatile republic of Dagestan. Five others, including a police officer and a national guardsman, were injured, Russian officials said

Yesterday

Committee pushes ride-hailing in B.C., makes recommendations on shape of service
(via Financial Post )

Ride-hailing is on its way to British Columbia after the online services received the unanimous support of an all-party committee of the legislature on Thursday.

16 Feb 2018

Premier John Horgan says he wants to keep LNG door open
(via CBC News)

No mention of LNG in throne speech, but Horgan insists he's looking out for northern B.C. interests.

16 Feb 2018

Liberal Ben Stewart captures byelection to replace Christy Clark
(via CTV News)

Stewart, the founder of Quails Gate Estate Winery, won the riding in 2013, but bowed out to allow Clark to run after she had lost the Vancouver-Point Grey riding.

16 Feb 2018

Police agencies across Canada say MMIW inquiry has not asked for case files to review
(via Ottawa Citizen)

Since its launch, the national inquiry has been criticized for not focusing enough on police missteps during investigations involving Indigenous women.

16 Feb 2018

Indigenous leaders question Quebec’s commitment to feds’ new framework
(via Global News)

First Nations leaders are welcoming Prime Minister Justin Trudeau‘s pledge to revamp the federal government’s relationship with Indigenous Peoples, but some Quebec chiefs fear their province’s obstructionist approach to self-determination could hinder the process.

16 Feb 2018

Patrick Brown says he will sue CTV News over reporting of allegations
(via The Globe and Mail)

Brown said in a Facebook post Thursday that two unnamed women who made their allegations to CTV are lying, and that his lawyers have reached out to the network's legal team.

16 Feb 2018

In leaked chats, Wikileaks discusses preference for GOP over Clinton, Russia, trolling, and feminists they don't like
(via The Intercept)

Twitter messages obtained by The Intercept provide an unfiltered window into WikiLeaks’ political goals before it dove into the white-hot center of the presidential election. The messages also reveal a running theme of sexism and misogyny, contain hints of anti-Semitism, and underline Assange’s well-documented obsession with his public image.

16 Feb 2018

How the west can help fix the Rohingya crisis
(via TIME)

Something is rotten in Myanmar, says former U.S. Congressman and Ambassador to the UN Bill Richardson. In less than 18 months, 800,000 Rohingya have fled from Rakhine State to Bangladesh to escape brutal clearance operations carried out by Myanmar’s military, in the wake of attacks by a new Rohingya militant group.

16 Feb 2018

Ottawa cancelled B.C. event on child care amid pipeline dispute
(via The Vancouver Sun)

The federal government abruptly cancelled a joint announcement with British Columbia over child care funding late last week, as tensions continued to mount over the Kinder Morgan pipeline dispute.

15 Feb 2018

CRA raids locations in Toronto, Calgary and West Vancouver in Panama Papers probe
(via CBC News)

Canada Revenue Agency officers, backed up by police, raided locations in three provinces Wednesday as part of a criminal tax-evasion probe stemming from the Panama Papers, the agency said.

15 Feb 2018

B.C. Green Party's Andrew Weaver loses defamation lawsuit
(via Times Colonist)

Judge says article by retired geography professor was derogatory, but poorly written, lacking in credibility.

15 Feb 2018

Justin Trudeau touts CBC spending as remedy to financial woes facing news outlets
(via Toronto Star)

The prime minister said his government has invested $675 million in the CBC and its French language arm, Radio-Canada and that has meant journalists now cover “areas where they had never served before.”

15 Feb 2018

CTV amends Patrick Brown sex claim story
(via BBC News)

In its original story, CTV reported that a woman met Mr Brown at a bar a decade ago when she was 17 and under the legal drinking age. The broadcaster now says she was not under age at the time. But her allegations remain the same, it added.

15 Feb 2018

Trudeau promises new legal framework for Indigenous people
(via CBC News)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is promising a fundamental rethink of how the federal government recognizes Indigenous rights and title, vowing to work with Indigenous partners to develop a new legal framework to foster self-governance.

15 Feb 2018

Here's a morbid exercise: Can you keep track of which school shooting was the last before Parkland?
(via Los Angeles Times)

If you started typing "school shooting" into Google search Wednesday afternoon, you might have noticed that auto fill took over and anticipated the next word: "today." So even the bloodless algorithms within Google recognize that, when one tries to find information about a fresh school shooting, the search needs to be narrowed. Because people are still searching the school shooting from last week. And the one before that. And the one before that.

15 Feb 2018

An ignominious end as Jacob Zuma resigns as president of South Africa
(via The Globe and Mail)

Less than 24 hours before a planned parliamentary vote to fire him, President Jacob Zuma has bowed to intense pressure from his own ruling party and announced his resignation in a late-night speech to the nation.

15 Feb 2018

B.C. is worst province for drug-affordability: UBC/SFU-led study
(via National Post)

B.C. residents are far more likely to face struggles with medication costs, especially drugs prescribed for mental-health conditions, according to a B.C.-led study published online in the CMAJ Open.

14 Feb 2018

International migration drives Metro Vancouver population growth, while losses fuelled by draw of neighbouring areas
(via The Vancouver Sun)

Metro Vancouver’s population recorded “losses” during the previous Census year due to residents leaving for neighbouring areas, but also saw population growth due to international migration.

14 Feb 2018

Liberals shake up Crown corporation after helicopter deal with Philippines
(via Canadian Press)

The Trudeau government has appointed a new chair of the Crown corporation that facilitated a controversial helicopter deal with the Philippines, and ordered the organization to become less reliant on selling arms.

14 Feb 2018

Education minister vows to take action on Alberta superintendent salaries
(via CBC News)

Education Minister David Eggen is vowing to take action after a report showed base salaries for Alberta school superintendents rose by 10 per cent between 2015 and 2016, while pay for teachers remained flat and compensation for equivalent positions within the provincial government dropped by 14 per cent.

14 Feb 2018

Wilson-Raybould commits to reforms after meeting with Boushie family
(via iPolitics)

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould doubled down Tuesday on her commitment that the government will look to make concrete changes to the justice system after an all-white jury found the farmer who shot and killed an Indigenous youth in Saskatchewan “not guilty.”

14 Feb 2018

How the death of Colten Boushie became recast as the story of a knight protecting his castle
(via The Globe and Mail)

During his opening statements in the trial of Gerald Stanley, the Saskatchewan farmer who on Friday was found not guilty in the murder of young Cree man Colten Boushie, defence lawyer Scott Spencer told the jury that, "For farm people, your yard is your castle. That's part of the story here." In the days that followed, some of the media coverage of the trial focused on the question of whether the notion of "defending one's castle" justifies the use of force resulting in injury or death to those who enter spaces they are seen as not belonging to.

14 Feb 2018

Fatal car crashes rise on 4/20, but we can’t say why
(via The Verge)

The risk for deadly car crashes is higher on 4/20 — the unofficial holiday for cannabis culture, new research says. While the study can’t directly tie the crashes to pot use, the findings add to a growing body of research that suggests stoned driving can be dangerous.

14 Feb 2018

Billionaires made so much money last year they could end extreme poverty seven times
(via TIME)

The global economy created a record number of billionaires last year, exacerbating inequality amid a weakening of workers’ rights and a corporate push to maximize shareholder returns, charity organization Oxfam International said in a new report.

14 Feb 2018

Vancouver swing-dancer banned from club after 'mansplaining'
(via The Vancouver Sun)

The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal has declined to hear a complaint by a Vancouver swing-dancer who says he was banned from his dance club after being accused of “mansplaining” by a younger female dancer.

13 Feb 2018

Throne Speech to lay out BC NDP’s childcare approach
(via The Globe and Mail)

The BC NDP picked up just enough seats in the provincial election last May to form a minority government after it promised voters to make life more affordable for British Columbians. In the Throne Speech on Tuesday, the New Democrats will finally provide details of how they will live up to a key part of that commitment: A universal daycare program for just $10 a day.

13 Feb 2018

Feds won’t entertain attempts by B.C. to stop expansion of Trans Mountain pipeline: Carr
(via Toronto Star )

The natural resources minister says the Conservatives are trying to manufacture a crisis and that B.C. is very aware Canada can and will do what it takes to exert its authority to have the pipeline built.

13 Feb 2018

'We hit a wall here': Regina mayor says Gerald Stanley trial has set back reconciliation efforts
(via the CBC News)

The trial of Gerald Stanley has divided people "to some degree" and set back reconciliation efforts, says Regina Mayor Michael Fougere.

13 Feb 2018

Ottawa extends review of China's proposed Aecon takeover due to security considerations
(via the Toronto Star)

The federal cabinet will consider advice from national security agencies on the planned purchase of the Canadian construction firm. The extension gives the Liberal cabinet another 90 days to consider whether national security considerations should block the proposed takeover.

13 Feb 2018

NDP sees ‘disturbing trend’ in federal infrastructure spending
(via The Globe and Mail)

The federal government is facing calls to improve the way it funds infrastructure projects after a Globe and Mail analysis found that ridings held by Liberal MPs are receiving a disproportionate share of federal funds.

13 Feb 2018

Satellite research shows world oceans expected to be 2 feet higher by end of century
(via Global News)

At the current rate, the world’s oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimetres) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers who published in Monday’s Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences.

13 Feb 2018

'We fear what's next': Oxfam reels from prostitution scandal
(via The Guardian)

As charity’s chief moves to reassure staff, some fear for its reputation while others feel a sense of inevitability.

13 Feb 2018

B.C. to move Family Day to third week of February
(via CTV News)

As of 2019, Family Day will fall on the third Monday of the month. That's when Alberta, New Brunswick, Ontario and Saskatchewan celebrate their Family Days.

12 Feb 2018

Christy Clark weighs in on B.C. and Alberta's trade war
(via National Observer)

“I think what the current government in British Columbia is doing is intentionally trying to frustrate the pipeline. It is not legal, it is unconstitutional and it is really bad for Canada. You know in this country we set rules, we set goalposts, and you can’t change them halfway through," Clark told reporters at the Shaw Centre.

12 Feb 2018

‘Not right:’ Outrage after jury finds Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley not guilty in shooting of Colten Boushie...
(via APTN)

From the beginning in August 2016, Colten Boushie’s death and the second-degree murder charge against Gerald Stanley exposed an ugly side in rural Saskatchewan – landowners who blame Indigenous people for high rates of property crime and First Nations who bear the brunt of that racism and hate.

12 Feb 2018

...While Tories accuse PM of 'political interference' after comments on Boushie case
(via CBC News)

The federal Conservatives are accusing Justin Trudeau of "political interference," after the prime minister responded to the acquittal of a white farmer, Gerald Stanley, in the death of a young Indigenous man, Colten Boushie, by saying the criminal justice system has to "do better."

12 Feb 2018

California police worked with neo-Nazis to pursue 'anti-racist' activists, documents show
(via The Guardian)

Officers expressed sympathy with white supremacists and sought their help to target counter-protesters after a violent 2016 rally, according to court documents.

12 Feb 2018

B.C. to see minimum wage rise to $12.65 in June on way to $15.20 by 2021
(via Times Colonist)

B.C.’s lowest-paid workers will get a $1.30-an-hour raise June 1 on the way to earning at least $15.20 in 2021, Premier John Horgan announced on Thursday.

9 Feb 2018

Federal gov't insists Trans Mountain pipeline will be built: Minister
(via The Vancouver Sun)

The federal government insisted Thursday that it’ll step in when necessary to ensure the Trans Mountain expansion project gets built, as it announced a restructuring of the process that saw the project approved.

9 Feb 2018

Philippines president to cancel Canada helicopter deal
(via BBC News)

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte plans to cancel the proposed purchase of 16 helicopters from Canada.

9 Feb 2018