The article you just read was brought to you by a few thousand dedicated readers. Will you join them?

Thanks for coming by The Tyee and reading one of many original articles we’ll post today. Our team works hard to publish in-depth stories on topics that matter on a daily basis. Our motto is: No junk. Just good journalism.

Just as we care about the quality of our reporting, we care about making our stories accessible to all who want to read them and provide a pleasant reading experience. No intrusive ads to distract you. No paywall locking you out of an article you want to read. No clickbait to trick you into reading a sensational article.

There’s a reason why our site is unique and why we don’t have to rely on those tactics — our Tyee Builders program. Tyee Builders are readers who chip in a bit of money each month (or one-time) to our editorial budget. This amazing program allows us to pay our writers fairly, keep our focus on quality over quantity of articles, and provide a pleasant reading experience for those who visit our site.

In the past year, we’ve been able to double our staff team and boost our reporting. We invest all of the revenue we receive into producing more and better journalism. We want to keep growing, but we need your support to do it.

Fewer than 1 in 100 of our average monthly readers are signed up to Tyee Builders. If we reach 1% of our readers signing up to be Tyee Builders, we could continue to grow and do even more.

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Support our growing independent newsroom and join Tyee Builders today.
Canada needs more independent media. And independent media needs you.

Did you know that most news organizations in Canada are owned by just a handful of companies? And that these companies have been shutting down newsrooms and laying off reporters continually over the past few decades?

Fact-based, credible journalism is essential to our democracy. Unlike many other newsrooms across the country, The Tyee’s independent newsroom is stable and growing.

How are we able to do this? The Tyee Builder program. Tyee Builders are readers who chip into our editorial budget so that we can keep doing what we do best: fact-based, in-depth reporting on issues that matter to our readers. No paywall. No junk. Just good journalism.

Fewer than 1 in 100 of our average monthly readers are signed up to be Tyee Builders. If we reach 1% of our readers signing up to be Tyee Builders, we could continue to grow and do even more.

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Support our growing independent newsroom and join Tyee Builders today.
We value: Our readers.
Our independence. Our region.
The power of real journalism.
We're reader supported.
Get our newsletter free.
Help pay for our reporting.
Life

The Labour Minister Whose Visa Card Was X-Rated

Socred Bob McClelland paid the price. Our series of dubious BC political moments continues.

By Tom Barrett 24 Apr 2013 | TheTyee.ca

Find Tyee election reporting team member and contributing editor Tom Barrett's previous Tyee articles here. Find him on Twitter or email him here.

image atom
Illustration by Jessie Donaldson.

[Editor's note: This is the seventh in our "Some Honourable Members" series, depicting the more dubious moments in B.C.'s political history, brought to you by veteran muckrakers Tom Barrett and Tom Hawthorn, one a day until election day.]

Late on the night of Feb. 26, 1985, B.C. labour minister Bob McClelland phoned a Victoria business known as Top Hat Productions. He'd had a fair bit to drink.

McClelland asked the woman who answered the phone if a girl could be sent to his room at the Chateau Victoria hotel. He asked how much he would have to pay for her company -- about $100 an hour, as it turned out -- and whether Top Hat took Visa.

We know these tawdry details because the Victoria police were watching Top Hat, one of about half a dozen escort agencies listed at the time in the Victoria Yellow Pages.

On Nov. 27, 1987, McClelland was called by the defence to testify in the trial of Top Hat's operator, Arlie Blakely, who faced 19 counts of prostitution-related offences.

A Canadian Press account of McClelland's court appearance describes him as "glum-faced," entering the court by himself and refusing to look at the "nearly full" public gallery. He testified that a Visa receipt from Top Hat for $130 was indeed his.

A demand from Blakely's lawyer, Robert Moore-Stewart, for "the story behind" the receipt was ruled out of order. McClelland told Moore-Stewart he did not tell the Top Hat receptionist what he intended to do with the girl.

The call took place the day before a cabinet shuffle in which McClelland moved from Labour to Industry and Small Business Development.

After his testimony, CP reported, McClelland "left the court and walked in solitude through the snow back to the provincial legislature. He declined comment to reporters."

Despite her insistence that she did not know the Top Hat escorts were engaging in sex with their clients, Blakely was found guilty of 10 of the 19 counts.

McClelland wasn't the only member of Bill Bennett's Social Credit to be embarrassed by affairs of the heart or other organs. In February 1986, health minister Jim Nielsen needed hospital treatment when he was punched by a jealous husband.

He required stitches and received a black eye when the man slugged him during a visit Nielsen made to the man's estranged wife, the secretary to another cabinet minister.

"I'm not terribly happy with myself," said Nielsen, the father of eight children. "Her husband came over and thumped me. I was in the wrong place at the wrong time. There was no provocation, no reason for it.

"I'm more embarrassed than I am angry. It's no big deal."

"I just don't feel very sorry for the man," said the aggrieved husband, who worked in the B.C. Finance Ministry.

Nielsen's wife forgave all.

"I do love him and I will take him back in a minute," Jean Nielsen told a reporter. "If he walks in the door right now, I will greet him with a hug and kiss."

Bennett didn't ask either Nielsen or McClelland to resign. Nielsen ran for the Socred leadership later that year, but lost to Bill Vander Zalm. McClelland quit cabinet soon after the leadership change. He did not run again.

In 1995, University of Victoria political scientist Norman Ruff told the Province's Stuart Hunter that the Top Hat scandal finished McClelland's time in politics.

"It didn't cost him his cabinet post, but he just faded away," he said. McClelland's career, Ruff said, couldn't survive all the "Don't leave home without it" jokes.  [Tyee]

Share this article

The Tyee is supported by readers like you

Join us and grow independent media in Canada

Facts matter. Get The Tyee's in-depth journalism delivered to your inbox for free.

LATEST STORIES

The Barometer

Do You Think the Injunction at Fairy Creek Will Be Reinstated?

Take this week's poll