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News

In High Rent Cities, Vehicles Become Homes

To stay in the Vancouver neighbourhood she loves, Angela lives full time in her RV.

By Aleksandra Sagan and Calyn Shaw 6 Aug 2012 | TheTyee.ca

Aleksandra Sagan is a freelance journalist interested in health and education issues. Follow her on Twitter here.

[Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series of videos created by students at the University of British Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism on how Vancouver's high cost of living affects the city's working poor. Mobile Living was created, shot and produced by Aleksandra Sagan and Calyn Shaw. Here's more on the inspiration behind the video.]

Angela began living in her RV nine years ago. She decided to embrace her alternative accommodations because she can’t afford an apartment in Kitsilano, but didn’t want to give up the community she loves. Now she lives for about $500 per month in her home on wheels.

Our video story began when we set out to learn more about how people in Vancouver deal with the expensive cost of living. Vancouver’s housing prices are high, and groceries are expensive along with other essentials. Some people are forced to live in their vehicles, and still others choose to do so. We set out to learn more about who was living this way and why.

As soon as we met Angela we wanted to tell her story. She is the perfect example of someone pushed to the margins by Vancouver’s high cost of living. And she isn’t alone: people all over the city live in cars, vans and RVs. This is just one story.  [Tyee]

Read more: Housing

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