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Rights + Justice
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Media

Can The Tyee Get to 2019 in 2019?

We’ll tell you what we mean in this note. And why you hold the answer.

By Robyn Smith and Jeanette Ageson 10 Dec 2018 | TheTyee.ca

Robyn Smith is editor in chief of The Tyee.
Jeanette Ageson is publisher of The Tyee.

It’s nearing the end of the year, the time for thank-you notes and letters between friends about the year that was.

As part of our community, we want to take a moment to say thank you. Every time you read an article, open our emails and share them with your networks, you make all the care and work that goes into our stories worth it.

We also want to offer a special thank you to subscribers who are part of the Tyee Builders program. In a time when the publishing industry is experiencing so much instability, readers who support The Tyee with a monthly contribution are a steadying force that allow us to weather the storms and not chase after every shiny object (*cough, Facebook, cough*).

It also means that our most important objective is reporting on stories that you, our readers, deem to be so necessary that you are willing to pay a bit to make possible. This means we can be laser-focused on telling the best stories, period, about this part of the world and ways people are working to make it better.

It’s a wonderful job description, and Tyee Builders make it possible.

We want to keep up this work, and be able to plan for bigger, bolder stories in 2019. And we need your help.

Can The Tyee get to 2019 monthly contributors in 2019? Click here to join now.

Currently, we have 1,787 readers who contribute to The Tyee on a monthly basis, and we deeply appreciate every one of them.

As we do our planning for 2019, we want to know that we have the resources on hand to pay our feisty reporters to dig deep and bring you stories that matter about our democracy, housing solutions, energy, climate change, youth issues and much, much more.

There are so many stories to tell, so many numbers to crunch, and many talented people on hand to do the work.

Will you help these stories get told in 2019? Help The Tyee get to 2019 monthly contributors by joining Tyee Builders today.

Our readers helped make many moments in 2018 possible. Here’s just a sampling of our coverage from this year:

Fixing health care: Other media moan about rising health costs. Our Andrew MacLeod published a book explaining how investing money to lessen poverty would translate directly to healthier Canadians.

Exposing Facebook: Other media cozy up to Facebook. The Tyee’s Bryan Carney sleuthed a security flaw in Facebook and told the world, triggering a fix by the social media giant.

Embracing Reconciliation: Other media sensationalize Indigenous issues. The Tyee’s Katie Hyslop methodically built a 13-part series exposing the roots of the child welfare crisis in B.C. and Indigenous-led solutions.

Solving housing: Other media came late to B.C.’s housing crisis. The Tyee rang the alarm a decade ago, publishing hundreds of solutions pieces since. Many of these ideas were embraced by politicians swept into office this year by voters clamouring for change.

Bringing clarity: “How to Talk about Relations between Indigenous Peoples and Europeans,” a Tyee essay by UBC history professor Paige Raibmon, was so helpfully clear the B.C. teachers union sent it to all members.

Pulling no punches: Covering Vancouver’s election amidst an affordability crisis, The Tyee’s Geoff Dembicki called it “a referendum on unchecked capitalism.”

Fostering amazing readers: Other media wish they had readers as smart, engaged and action oriented as ours. Example: When regular Tyee commenter Merv Adey passed away, his online friends decided to raise money in his honour for a Tyee series explaining the electoral reform referendum, read by tens of thousands.

Being reader supported ensures The Tyee its independence. We don’t have to rely on corporate bosses or American hedge funds to pay our bills. We’re accountable to you.

But only if you become a Tyee Builder, and help us get to 2019 in 2019.

We need to add 232 monthly supporters to our roster to help start 2019 with a bang. Will you join us?

To find out more about how to support independent news media at The Tyee, click here.  [Tyee]

Read more: Rights + Justice, Media

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