We hope you found this article interesting, enough to read to the bottom. Help us publish more in 2022.

Thanks for coming by The Tyee and reading one of many original articles we’ll post today. Our team works hard to publish in-depth stories on topics that matter on a daily basis. Our motto is: No junk. Just good journalism.

Just as we care about the quality of our reporting, we care about making our stories accessible to all who want to read them and provide a pleasant reading experience. No intrusive ads to distract you. No paywall locking you out of an article you want to read. No clickbait to trick you into reading a sensational article.

There’s a reason why our site is unique and why we don’t have to rely on those tactics — our Tyee Builders program. Tyee Builders are readers who chip in a bit of money each month (or one-time) to our editorial budget. This amazing program allows us to pay our writers fairly, keep our focus on quality over quantity of articles, and provide a pleasant reading experience for those who visit our site.

In the past two years, we’ve been able to double our staff team and boost our reporting. We invest all of the revenue we receive into producing more and better journalism. We want to keep growing, but we need your support to do it.

We’re on a mission to add 650 new monthly supporters to our ranks to help us have another year of impactful journalism – will you join us?

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Help us hit our year-end target of 650 new monthly supporters and join Tyee Builders today.
We’re looking for 650 new monthly supporters to fund our newsroom – are you one of them?

Small independent news media are having a moment – we’re gaining supporters, winning awards, and publishing more impactful journalism than ever. We’re starting to see glimmers of a hopeful future for independent journalism in Canada.

The Tyee works for our readers, because we are funded by you. We don’t lock our articles behind a paywall, and we focus all of our energy into publishing original, in-depth journalism that you won’t read anywhere else. It’s our full-time job because readers pay us to do it.

Over the last two years, we’ve been able to double our staff team and publish more than ever. We’re gearing up for another year and we need to know how much we are working with. Thousands of Tyee readers have signed up to support our independent newsroom through our Tyee Builders program, and we’re inviting you to join.

From now until Dec. 31, we’re aiming to bring aboard 650 new monthly supporters to The Tyee to help us do even more in 2022.

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Help us hit our year-end target of 650 new monthly supporters and join Tyee Builders today.
We value: Our readers.
Our independence. Our region.
The power of real journalism.
We're reader supported.
Get our newsletter free.
Help pay for our reporting.
Life

Zombie Season

Scenes from a cultural collision at the intersection of life and death, Vancouver, British Columbia.

By Christopher Grabowski 25 Aug 2012 | TheTyee.ca

Photojournalist Christopher Grabowski is a contributing editor to The Tyee. Find his previous Tyee articles here.

On a pleasantly warm afternoon last Saturday, several hundred costumed people gathered at the northwest side of the Vancouver Art Gallery for the annual zombie walk. The size of the crowd was at least doubled by the presence of photographers and tourists with cameras.

Zombie walks are a recent North American and Australian phenomenon that began as a promotional event for horror B movies but evolved into a more complex social artifact apparently connected with the Halloween tradition which in turn is rooted in the ancient Celtic festival of the dead.

When Celtic domains were conquered, this Druidic celebration called Samhain was incorporated first into Roman and then into Christian ceremonies. In the 19th century, Irish immigrants brought Halloween to the New World where it is now comfortably aligned with the dominant cultural currents of fun and commerce.

An unexpected context to this year's Vancouver zombie walk was brought about by a much smaller group gathered around the southeast corner of the gallery. There, about 30 people protested American and Canadian foreign policies, in particular, the American practice of robotic assassinations carried out in the Pakistani tribal lands.

A young woman in hijab, apparently not used to speaking in public, talked about women and children killed without warning, their lives disregarded, their deaths trivialized as collateral damage. The number of civilian casualties that she asserted matched the size of the crowd of fake dead gathered at the other side of the gallery.

A little farther from the group of protesters, a well dressed, presumably Pakistani-Canadian family sat on the bench. The man held a sign related to the protest. The boy sitting on his lap was relaxed and content in a way one would associate with a safe and happy childhood. His mother, though, looked concerned and wary.

Several zombies went by carrying cups of ice cream. The two groups did their best to ignore each other.

582px version of Vancouver zombie walk
582px version of Vancouver zombie walk
582px version of Vancouver zombie walk
582px version of Vancouver zombie walk
Aug. 18, 2012, Vancouver Art Gallery. Photos: Christopher Grabowski.

Share this article

The Tyee is supported by readers like you

Join us and grow independent media in Canada

Facts matter. Get The Tyee's in-depth journalism delivered to your inbox for free

LATEST STORIES

The Barometer

Tyee Poll: Are You Preparing for the Next Climate Disaster?

Take this week's poll