The article you just read was brought to you by a few thousand dedicated readers. Will you join them?

Thanks for coming by The Tyee and reading one of many original articles we’ll post today. Our team works hard to publish in-depth stories on topics that matter on a daily basis. Our motto is: No junk. Just good journalism.

Just as we care about the quality of our reporting, we care about making our stories accessible to all who want to read them and provide a pleasant reading experience. No intrusive ads to distract you. No paywall locking you out of an article you want to read. No clickbait to trick you into reading a sensational article.

There’s a reason why our site is unique and why we don’t have to rely on those tactics — our Tyee Builders program. Tyee Builders are readers who chip in a bit of money each month (or one-time) to our editorial budget. This amazing program allows us to pay our writers fairly, keep our focus on quality over quantity of articles, and provide a pleasant reading experience for those who visit our site.

In the past year, we’ve been able to double our staff team and boost our reporting. We invest all of the revenue we receive into producing more and better journalism. We want to keep growing, but we need your support to do it.

Fewer than 1 in 100 of our average monthly readers are signed up to Tyee Builders. If we reach 1% of our readers signing up to be Tyee Builders, we could continue to grow and do even more.

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Support our growing independent newsroom and join Tyee Builders today.
Canada needs more independent media. And independent media needs you.

Did you know that most news organizations in Canada are owned by just a handful of companies? And that these companies have been shutting down newsrooms and laying off reporters continually over the past few decades?

Fact-based, credible journalism is essential to our democracy. Unlike many other newsrooms across the country, The Tyee’s independent newsroom is stable and growing.

How are we able to do this? The Tyee Builder program. Tyee Builders are readers who chip into our editorial budget so that we can keep doing what we do best: fact-based, in-depth reporting on issues that matter to our readers. No paywall. No junk. Just good journalism.

Fewer than 1 in 100 of our average monthly readers are signed up to be Tyee Builders. If we reach 1% of our readers signing up to be Tyee Builders, we could continue to grow and do even more.

If you appreciate what The Tyee publishes and want to help us do more, please sign up to be a Tyee Builder today. You pick the amount, and you can cancel any time.

Support our growing independent newsroom and join Tyee Builders today.
We value: Our readers.
Our independence. Our region.
The power of real journalism.
We're reader supported.
Get our newsletter free.
Help pay for our reporting.
Opinion

Nine Per Cent Gordo

A preliminary attempt to put the premier's latest popularity rating into some useful perspective.

By Steve Burgess 19 Oct 2010 | TheTyee.ca

Steve Burgess writes about film, culture (and this week) politics for The Tyee.

image atom
Premier Campbell: melting like pumpkin ice cream.

A new Angus Reid poll gives Premier Gordon Campbell an approval rating of nine per cent. When your poll numbers drop to a single digit, it's pretty obvious which digit the public is flashing.

But bad as it looks, there is hope. Campbell still matches up well in selected contests. The BC Liberal leader is running slightly ahead of belief in the Loch Ness Monster, and dead even against cherry vanilla ice cream.

The premier's numbers are too low to allow comparisons against other political leaders. News reports often cite Richard Nixon's post-Watergate poll ratings, but in fact Nixon's approval ratings stayed around the mid-20s even as he was shown to have used the U.S. constitution as a dishrag. Campbell's approval rating not only lags well behind Nixon's lows, but also behind the percentage of Americans who feel Sarah Palin would make a good president.

The monster lives!

So to find proper parallels for Campbell's current popularity, it is necessary to look at different measurements -- in effect, to compare societal niche groups. Campbell supporters in B.C. form a group statistically comparable to the percentage of Americans who do not recognize the name Madonna; his support group is statistically smaller than the pool of Americans who have never heard of Oprah Winfrey. They are statistically equal to the percentage of Britons who believe that crop circles are the work of extra-terrestrial beings.

Campbell is running one per cent ahead of Americans who believe Emily Post invented a breakfast cereal.

But there's good news too. Vampires have been popular lately, and Campbell is also managing to stay ahead of them. To be clear, this poll did not rate the likability of vampires, but actual belief in their existence. Campbell support also edges out Bigfoot belief, although all these numbers fall within the margin of error.

If Campbell was a movie, his reviews would match up roughly with the 2007 Eddie Murphy movie, Norbit. According to website Rotten Tomatoes, critical approval for the alleged comedy stands at eight per cent. Critic Mark Dujsik wrote, "Norbit is so bad, it has redefined my concept of Hell." Campbell maintains a one-point lead over that experience.

The Comeback Kid?

Poll numbers can change, of course. Campbell is determined to fight. "I'm going to run as long as I'm excited by what’s taking place in the province," he said recently.
 Campbell's political determination is exciting news for pollsters -- it suggests that new low-water marks are yet to come. If current trends hold, Premier Campbell may soon approach the approval ratings currently enjoyed by ice cream flavours such as pumpkin and eggnog.

Despite his optimism, there can be little doubt that for Campbell, a rocky road lies ahead. Five percentage points ahead, in fact -- and he's eight points behind mint chocolate chip.  [Tyee]

Read more: Politics

Share this article

The Tyee is supported by readers like you

Join us and grow independent media in Canada

Facts matter. Get The Tyee's in-depth journalism delivered to your inbox for free.

LATEST STORIES

The Barometer

Do You Think the Injunction at Fairy Creek Will Be Reinstated?

Take this week's poll