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Deconstructing Dinner
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Meet Your Wheat

Podcast: 'Deconstructing Dinner' explores the local grain revolution with a tour of Creston wheat fields.

Jon Steinman 13 Sep 2008TheTyee.ca

Jon Steinman is producer and host of Kootenay Co-op Radio's program Deconstructing Dinner. A new podcast with notes is posted here every Friday afternoon. All Deconstructing Dinner podcasts can be found here.

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[Editor's note: This is a summary of a podcast you can download or listen to from this page.]

Since the Local Grain Revoltuion series first aired in March 2008, a lot has transpired as a result of that broadcast. The Nelson-Creston grain community supported agriculture (CSA) project has been mentioned in the House of Commons; it was a feature in a May issue of The Globe an Mail; and people from across North America have become inspired to seek out locally grown grain.

On this exciting part II of the series, host Jon Steinman travels along with the first CSA tour. Members were given the opportunity to meet local farmers and see the grain that would soon become their bread, cakes or pasta.

This broadcast captures just how easily, with the will and effort of the community, we can all work together to resurrect local food systems.

Voices

Matt Lowe, Climate Change Campaigner, West Kootenay EcoSociety (Nelson, B.C.) -- The West Kootenay EcoSociety promotes ecologically and socially sound communities while protecting species and ecosystems in the Southern Columbia Mountains ecoregion. Matt is the co-founder of the grain CSA.

Roy Lawrence, Farmer, Lawrence Farm (Creston, B.C.) -- Roy is a third-generation farmer. He has long farmed using conventional methods but sees the CSA as an opportunity to transition to growing naturally.

Keith Huscroft, Farmer, Huscroft Farm (Lister, B.C.) -- Keith is a fourth-generation farmer. His great-grandparents were the first white settlers in the Creston Valley and his farm has been in operation for about 100 years. Keith takes all measures to ensure no inputs are required on his farm. He uses mixed farming practices and fertilizes using only animal and green manures. He is one of a shrinking number of farmers farming with horses instead of fossil fuel dependent technologies.

Tammy Hardwick, Manager, Creston & District Museum (Creston, B.C.) -- Much of Creston's history is rooted in agriculture, however, much of this history is now found indoors at the Creston museum.

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