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Boo!

What scares the world at the moment.

Angus Reid 31 Oct 2006TheTyee.ca

This Tyee series shares with you the research conducted by the Angus Reid Global Monitor, the Vancouver-based leaders in public opinion analysis. TrendWatch columns offer quick, concise context for developing stories in B.C. and beyond.

Halloween marks a natural occasion to note what is scaring the bejeezus out of people around the world. Polls show fears range from global warming to nuclear war and mad cow disease. But amidst a "war on terror," no country rates terrorism as its primary fear. Instead, even in Britain, the U.S. is perceived as the biggest threat to global security.

In the U.S., global warming is seen as a real and serious threat. For more info, click here.

Canadians fear how the current government will deal with climate change. For more info, click here.

In Israel, the idea of a nuclear Iran has become a cause of concern for the population, and is now perceived as the biggest threat to the country. More detail here.

In Denmark, the publication of the cartoons of Muslim prophet Mohammed earlier this year sparked fears of a clash of civilizations. More info here.

In Spain, immigration has become an important source of anxiety. More here.

In Japan, 80 per cent of respondents are afraid of American beef after the recent mad cow scare. For more info, click here.

In Britain, many feel that Islam poses a threat against Western liberal democracy. More detail here.

...And believe race relations are becoming increasingly difficult in the country. Click here to learn more.

In Russia and the U.S., North Korea is the source of more and more fretting.

Still, Washington is not widely seen as rescuer. In fact, even among the populaces of U.S. allies Britain, Spain and France, America is perceived as the biggest threat to global stability -- more than Iran, China or North Korea. Read more here.

And in Iraq, the "liberating" soldiers are starting to become the bogeymen, as 78 per cent of respondents think the soldiers are provoking more conflict than they are preventing. Details here.  [Tyee]

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