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Reported Elsewhere

Ontario is going ahead with its guaranteed income program
(via CBC News)

The long-debated idea of a guaranteed minimum annual income for Canadians moves a small step closer to reality this week.

31 Aug 2016

Why is this Canadian mayor blocking black activists on Twitter?
(via Fusion)

If you take a look at the Twitter account of Jim Watson, the mayor of Ottawa, Canada, you’ll notice how involved he is in his community.

31 Aug 2016

The new TTIP? Meet TISA, the ‘secret privatisation pact that poses a threat to democracy’
(via The Independent)

An international trade deal being negotiated in secret is a “turbo-charged privatisation pact” that poses a threat to democratic sovereignty and “the very concept of public services”, campaigners have warned.

31 Aug 2016

French PM suggests naked breasts represent France better than a headscarf
(via The Guardian)

The French prime minister has drawn criticism for suggesting that naked breasts are more representative of France than a headscarf, in the latest flare-up of the bitter political row over the burkini.

31 Aug 2016

A 19-year-old created a free robot lawyer that has beaten 160,000 parking tickets
(via Business Insider)

The very first robot lawyer that was designed to challenge parking tickets has been wildly successful since it was launched last Fall.

31 Aug 2016

Even Roger Federer gets old: How to deal with the reality of aging athletes
(via the New York Times)

He heard a click. That was how Roger Federer discovered the knee injury that cost him most of his 2016 season.

31 Aug 2016

That time we made a sex tape
(via The Walrus)

The footage was grainy and unflattering – and I needed to know my ex had destroyed it.

31 Aug 2016

What I wish I could have asked Stephen Harper
(via TVO)

Now that Harper has stepped down as the Conservative MP for Calgary Heritage and left public life, I’ve given some thought to the questions I’d still like to ask him.

31 Aug 2016

These are seven of the greatest moments in Gene Wilder’s career
(via BuzzFeed)

From pure imagination to exhilarating eccentricity, here are the scenes that made us fall in love with Gene Wilder, who died Monday at 83.

Today

Colin Kaepernick and the radical uses of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’
(via The New Yorker)

Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand during “The Star-Spangled Banner” is only the latest chapter in the anthem’s long, polarizing history.

Today

Is Canada’s housing market nearing an ‘extreme bubble’?
(via Global News)

The Canadian real estate market is on the verge of a massive bubble, warns a former Lehman Brothers executive, citing a struggling Canadian economy and high debt to income ratios.

Today

A decade on, vaccine has halved the cervical cancer rate
(via BBC News)

The world’s first cancer vaccine was administered in Australia exactly 10 years ago.

Today

So, aliens? SETI has observed a ‘strong’ signal that may originate from a Sun-like star
(via Ars Technica)

It remains only the barest of probabilities that astronomers have just found evidence of extraterrestrial, intelligent life. Nevertheless, in the community of astronomers and other scientists who use radio telescopes to search the heavens for beacons of life there is considerable excitement about a new signal observed by a facility in Russia.

Today

UN pays tens of millions to Assad regime under Syria aid programme
(via The Guardian)

The UN has awarded contracts worth tens of millions of dollars to people closely associated with the Syrian president, Bashar al-Assad, as part of an aid programme that critics fear is increasingly at the whim of the government in Damascus, a Guardian investigation has found.

Today

Iceland’s largest volcano set to erupt after biggest tremors in 40 years
(via The Independent)

Iceland raised the alarm after its largest volcano was hit by the biggest tremors since 1977.

Today

Could any speech on illegal immigration help Trump?
(via The Atlantic)

The Republican candidate has promised to address the subject Wednesday in Arizona, where he expects a huge crowd. What he’ll tell them is a mystery.

Today

Chinese-Canadians fear China’s rising clout is muzzling them
(via the New York Times)

Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, is due in China on Tuesday for a much anticipated visit, hoping to reset what had been an up-and-down relationship under the previous government. Closer ties, Mr. Trudeau says, would release untapped prosperity at home and promote Canadian values like good governance and the rule of law in China.

Yesterday

Why is the Conservative Party allowing calls for the prime minister’s assassination on its Facebook page?
(via The Walrus)

The first call to kill Justin Trudeau came on October 23, four days after the 2015 election.

Yesterday

Canada’s opioid crisis: We are all enablers
(via The Globe and Mail)

You’re familiar with the popular portrayal of the drug dealer: an evil and insidious grim reaper who visits agony and angst, disease and death upon the community.

Yesterday

Just 90 companies are to blame for most climate change, this ‘carbon accountant’ says
(via Science)

Last month, geographer Richard Heede received a subpoena from Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), chairman of the House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Smith, a climate change doubter, became concerned when the attorneys general of several states launched investigations into whether ExxonMobil had committed fraud by sowing doubts about climate change even as its own scientists knew it was taking place.

Yesterday

Russian journalist critical of Vladimir Putin found dead on his birthday with gunshot wound to head
(via The Independent)

A well-known Russian journalist and critic of President Vladimir Putin has been found dead in his Kiev apartment with a gunshot wound to the head.

Yesterday

How are young girls faring in the 21st century?
(via the New York Review of Books)

By some measures, girls appear to be faring rather well in twenty-first-century America. But according to two new, rather bleak books, these official signs of progress have given us an unduly rosy impression of the modern girl’s lot.

Yesterday

Choosing to stay in the Mormon Church despite its racist legacy
(via The Atlantic)

One black woman tries to reconcile her faith with the institution’s history of discrimination.

Yesterday

Mars scientists leave dome on Hawaii mountain after year in isolation
(via The Guardian)

Six scientists have completed a year-long simulation of a Mars mission, during which they lived in a dome in near-isolation.

Yesterday

Canada’s tax agency is ‘out for blood’: not from global-income cheats, but from its leaking auditors
(via the South China Morning Post)

Auditors past and present, frustrated by lack of action in the Vancouver real estate arena, describe a departmental culture that sees law enforcement and principles lose out to the pursuit of easy audits against ‘the little guys.’

26 Aug 2016

Metro Vancouver house sales allegedly plummet after offshore tax introduced
(via the Vancouver Sun)

Home sales dropped in Metro Vancouver by up to 86 per cent after the introduction of the foreign investor tax on Aug. 2, according to official MLS data only available to realtors.

26 Aug 2016

In Colombia, 52 years of war, 220,000 dead, and now peace
(via CNN)

The end seems near for one of the world's longest running conflicts, with the announcement of a peace deal between the government of Colombia and the Marxist rebels of FARC.

26 Aug 2016

Federal spies are suddenly intercepting 26 times more Canadian phone calls and communications
(via National Post)

Interception of Canadians’ private communications by the federal electronic spy agency increased 26-fold last year, for reasons authorities won’t fully explain.

26 Aug 2016

Canadian media outlets did not fact-check a Fraser Institute study that’s been debunked many times
(via PressProgress)

Why aren’t Canadian media outlets fact-checking the Fraser Institute?

26 Aug 2016

Anne Frank today is a Syrian girl
(via the New York Times)

On April 30, 1941, a Jewish man here in Amsterdam wrote a desperate letter to an American friend, pleading for help emigrating to the United States.

26 Aug 2016

THC makes rats lazy, less willing to try cognitively demanding tasks: UBC study
(via UBC)

New research from the University of British Columbia suggests there may be some truth to the belief that marijuana use causes laziness – at least in rats.

26 Aug 2016

In the name of gender equality, Norway has introduced compulsory military service for women
(via The Local)

The military’s gender balance is not entirely equal yet, but almost a third of the Norwegian army conscripts born in 1997 were women this summer.

26 Aug 2016

Black voters don’t recognize Donald Trump’s view of their lives...
(via the New York Times)

Campaigning over the past week, Donald J. Trump has painted a bleak and dire picture of black America.

25 Aug 2016

And American Muslim women are taking him on
(via The Atlantic)

The U.S. presidential nominee’s anti-Islam rhetoric has motivated some to speak out against stereotypes.

25 Aug 2016

Mounties to allow women in uniform to wear hijabs
(via BBC News)

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police, known as the Mounties, is to allow women in uniform to wear hijabs.

25 Aug 2016

Files show what UK diplomats really thought of 1980s Canada, but were too polite to say
(via The Globe and Mail)

The British government viewed Brian Mulroney as “glib,” “superficial” and “almost paranoid” in the months leading up to him becoming prime minister in 1984 while outgoing prime minister Pierre Trudeau was seen as “bloodless” and “over-intellectual.”

25 Aug 2016

Nobel prize winner Stiglitz calls TPP ‘outrageous’
(via CNN)

Nobel prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz says it’s “absolutely wrong” for the U.S. to pass the trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

25 Aug 2016

The New York Times announces plans to expand to Canada
(via The Huffington Post)

Danielle Rhoades Ha, the company’s vice-president of communications, said in an email that the paper is actively assessing how to further extend its reach to readers in Canada and Australia in the coming months.

25 Aug 2016

Another Earth-like planet may be a lot closer than we thought
(via Space)

The star closest to the sun hosts a planet that may be very much like Earth, a new study reports.

25 Aug 2016

Will the Clinton Foundation survive?
(via The New Yorker)

It’s getting hard to keep track of all the developments in the story of the Clinton Foundation and Clinton e-mails.

25 Aug 2016

Justin Trudeau rules out burkini ban in Canada
(via The Guardian)

Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister, has defended individual rights and freedoms when asked about a controversy in France over a burkini ban.

24 Aug 2016

Canadian pensions selling billions worth of Vancouver real estate
(via Better Dwelling)

You know about the residential real estate bubble in Vancouver. Banks are preparing for it, US hedge funds have been piling into short positions, and even the Chinese government is starting to warn the Chinese about it. Yet there’s been little discussion about how commercial real estate in Vancouver– that’s about to change big time.

24 Aug 2016

A huge crack is spreading across one of Antarctica’s biggest ice shelves
(via the Toronto Star)

The crack is likely to lead to the loss of an enormous chunk of the Larsen C ice shelf, which is “slightly smaller than Scotland.”

24 Aug 2016

FBI investigating Russian hack of New York Times reporters
(via CNN)

Hackers thought to be working for Russian intelligence have carried out a series of cyber breaches targeting reporters at the New York Times and other U.S. news organizations, according to U.S. officials briefed on the matter.

24 Aug 2016

NASA reestablishes contact with long lost spacecraft after two years of silence
(via The Verge)

NASA has reestablished contact with its STEREO-B spacecraft, nearly two years after losing communication with the vehicle.

24 Aug 2016

Saskatchewan town unveils new slogan to replace ‘Land of Rape and Honey’
(via Global News)

The “Land of Rape and Honey” has been officially retired as the slogan for Tisdale, Sask.

24 Aug 2016

Netflix to stream new ‘Anne of Green Gables’ adaptation globally
(via The Globe and Mail)

Anne Shirley is going around the world.

24 Aug 2016

Is Wikileaks putting people at risk?
(via BBC News)

Whistle-blowing site Wikileaks has been criticised for not doing enough to screen sensitive information found in documents released via the site.

24 Aug 2016

Elizabeth May staying on as Green Party Leader
(via CTV News)

The Green Party’s Elizabeth May says she’s going to stay on as leader, despite saying earlier this summer that she might step down.

23 Aug 2016

Ryan Lochte has lost all his sponsorships
(via BBC News)

Four sponsors have dropped disgraced US Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte, including swimwear manufacturer Speedo and fashion label Ralph Lauren.

23 Aug 2016

Now it can be said – the Olympics are a waste of time and money
(via CBC News)

It has been a trying few weeks for those of us who are less than enamoured of the Olympic Games.

23 Aug 2016

Stunning blue lakes spotted in Antarctica are a sign its giant ice sheet may soon collapse, researchers warn
(via The Daily Mail)

At first glance, they are a stunning image of the beauty of nature.

23 Aug 2016

High-speed internet price war spreads to Western Canada as Shaw, Telus duke it out
(via Financial Post)

The broadband price war is finally heating up in Western Canada.

23 Aug 2016

Philippine police anti-drugs operations and vigilantes have killed scores since July
(via The Guardian)

The Philippines’ national police chief has said 712 people have been killed in police operations since 1 July in President Rodrigo Duterte’s hardline war on drugs.

23 Aug 2016

Orangutans face complete extinction within 10 years
(via The Independent)

Orangutans will be extinct from the planet within 10 years unless action is taken to preserve forests in Indonesia and Malaysia where they live, a conservation charity has warned.

23 Aug 2016

How #BlackLivesMatter came to define a movement
(via the New York Times)

It had existed as a phrase for some time, but it wasn’t until two black men died in the summer of 2014 that Black Lives Matter began to flicker to life as a Twitter hashtag.

23 Aug 2016