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Reported Elsewhere

We’ve passed the carbon tipping point
(via Vice)

It’s a banner week for the end of the world, because we’ve officially pushed atmospheric carbon levels past their dreaded 400 parts per million.

Yesterday

BC’s film industry gobbling up industrial buildings across metro
(via the Vancouver Sun)

B.C.’s booming film industry is making it difficult for other businesses to compete for space amid a pressing shortage of industrial buildings across Metro Vancouver, say commercial real estate experts.

Yesterday

Canadian Catholic bishops issue guidelines to refuse funerals in assisted deaths
(via the Calgary Herald)

Guidelines from the Catholic Bishops of Alberta and the Northwest Territories say priests should refuse funerals for some people who choose assisted suicide.

Yesterday

Montreal passes controversial pit bull ban
(via CBC News)

Nearly four months after a brutal dog attack that claimed the life of a Montreal woman, the city has passed its contentious pit bull ban.

Yesterday

Inside the nightmare of Trump’s energy policy
(via Rolling Stone)

At the Shale Insight conference in Pittsburgh last week, Donald Trump promised a roomful of fracking executives and stalwarts, “Oh, you will like me so much, you will get that business. You are going to like Donald Trump.”

Yesterday

BP and Shell investors urged to reward bosses for backing green energy
(via The Guardian)

Shell and BP’s pay plans encourage their bosses to dig for oil instead of investing in low-carbon energy and should be overhauled by shareholders, according to the campaign group ShareAction.

Yesterday

One in 10 children has ‘AIDS defence’
(via BBC News)

A 10th of children have a “monkey-like” immune system that stops them developing AIDS, a study suggests.

Yesterday

The end of meat? Economics, the environment and changing tastes have top protein feeling the heat
(via Financial Post)

There’s a new menu item at world-famous chef David Chang’s New York City restaurant Momofuku Nishi: The Impossible Burger. It’s crispy brown on the outside and juicy pink on the inside. It sizzles when it cooks, gives off a meaty smell and even bleeds.

Yesterday

You’re not imagining things: A new study finds that Earth is the warmest it’s been in the last 120,000 years
(via Business Insider)

A new study paints a picture of an Earth that is warmer than it has been in about 120,000 years, and is locked into eventually hitting its hottest mark in more than 2 million years.

29 Sep 2016

New Airbnb rules could shut down 1,000 short-term listings in Vancouver
(via CBC News)

Gregor Robertson says a new proposal that would require people to get a licence for Airbnb and other short-term rentals could put up to 1,000 homes back into the long-term rental pool.

29 Sep 2016

Eby calls for army of auditors to examine BC real estate deals
(via Metro)

NDP MLA David Eby is calling on the B.C. government to hire more tax auditors to examine the Metro Vancouver phenomenon of homeowners who report poverty-level incomes, but own homes worth millions.

29 Sep 2016

IMF study warns free trade seen as benefiting ‘only a fortunate few’...
(via The Guardian)

The International Monetary Fund has warned that free trade is increasingly seen as benefiting only the well-off and that help is needed for those whose job prospects have been damaged by globalisation in order to put fresh momentum behind removing barriers to international commerce.

29 Sep 2016

...and that’s what’s fueling the global backlash on trade
(via the New York Times)

Trade is under attack in much of the world, because economists failed to anticipate the accompanying joblessness, and governments failed to help.

29 Sep 2016

Canadians are just $200 away from being overwhelmed by debt, new survey finds
(via Financial Post)

More than half of Canadians are now within $200 of being unable to handle their monthly costs, a new debt survey shows.

29 Sep 2016

Liberals approve Pacific NorthWest LNG project despite environmental concerns
(via The Globe and Mail)

The federal Liberal cabinet has approved construction of an $11.4-billion terminal to export liquefied natural gas from northern British Columbia, subject to the project’s owners meeting an array of conditions designed to reduce the proposal’s environmental footprint.

29 Sep 2016

Lessons for Canada from how the Koch brothers hijacked democracy
(via the Vancouver Sun)

This was supposed to be the year that the American billionaire brothers, Charles and David Koch, bought the presidency in their zealous bid to reshape the United States into a libertarian utopia.

29 Sep 2016

Donald Trump was ‘a failed bully’ in his first debate with Clinton
(via The New Yorker)

On a pivotal night, Trump’s instinct for his opponent’s weakness seemed to desert him.

28 Sep 2016

Homemakers, students own $107 million in Vancouver neighbourhood...
(via News 1130)

The BC NDP is once again drawing attention to who owns some of Vancouver’s priciest properties on the city’s West Side.

28 Sep 2016

...as the city is named as the financial center with the world’s riskiest housing bubble
(via CNBC)

Vancouver has been identified by the Swiss bank UBS as having the riskiest housing bubble in the world.

28 Sep 2016

BC chiefs refuse to attend reconciliation event with Will and Kate
(via The Huffington Post)

A ceremony involving the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge meant to symbolize the reconciliation of British Columbia’s Aboriginal Peoples was rebuffed by a First Nations group.

28 Sep 2016

Air Canada, WestJet ‘colluded’ to charge checked bag fee, proposed class action alleges
(via CBC News)

Suit aims to get money back for passengers who paid $25 checked luggage fee since October 2014.

28 Sep 2016

Single clothes wash may release 700,000 microplastic fibres, study finds
(via The Guardian)

Each cycle of a washing machine could release more than 700,000 microscopic plastic fibres into the environment, according to a study.

28 Sep 2016

How to write a bestseller: What Big Data reveals about the way we read — and what we’ll buy
(via The Walrus)

“Only a person with a Best Seller mind can write Best Sellers,” according to Aldous Huxley. No doubt he was being contemptuous, but he wasn’t wrong: despite the diversity of genre on the bestseller list, there really are a series of habits shared by top-selling authors.

28 Sep 2016

The Trouble with Sombreros: On Lionel Shriver’s cultural appropriation speech
(via the New York Review of Books)

In early September, the novelist Lionel Shriver gave a speech at the Brisbane Writers Festival in which she expressed her hope that identity politics and the concept of cultural appropriation would turn out to be passing fads.

28 Sep 2016

Homa Hoodfar, Concordia professor, released from Tehran jail
(via CBC News)

Montreal university professor Homa Hoodfar, who had been detained in Tehran's infamous Evin prison since June 6, has been released, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has confirmed.

27 Sep 2016

Saudi women file petition to end male guardianship system
(via BBC News)

A petition signed by more than 14,000 Saudi women calling for an end to the country's male guardianship system is being handed to the government.

27 Sep 2016

Food prices across Canada dropped in August for first time in years
(via CTV News)

For the first time in years, food prices dropped in nearly every province in August, according to Statistics Canada. One expert says it could be the start of “significant ongoing deflation in food aisles across the country.”

27 Sep 2016

To police unions: Stop protecting rotten cops
(via The Huffington Post)

People like to excuse police violence by claiming that it’s just a few bad apples. Perhaps that's true, but then who is electing the police union leaders who make it their job to defend these bad apples?

27 Sep 2016

How the one per cent pays to see a doctor faster than you
(via Vice)

I’d seen this many times before: a generic travel poster promising jewel-toned, turquoise seas washing over dazzling coral-white sands. A pair of flawless sun-bronzed legs were framed by a cobalt-blue sky and lush, tropical foliage.

27 Sep 2016

What is happening to hockey in Quebec?
(via the New York Times)

When the two-day Quebec Hockey Summit took place in Montreal in 2011, it touched on issues including head injuries and ways to improve the game.

27 Sep 2016

Pope Francis backs protests against same-sex marriage in Mexico
(via The Independent)

The Pope has voiced his support for Mexicans campaigning against the government’s push to legalise same-sex marriage.

27 Sep 2016

How a single tree, and the logger who saved it, have changed the way we see British Columbia’s old-growth forests
(via The Walrus)

Various large trees dominate these rainforests — western red cedars, Sitka spruces, western hemlocks — but the Douglas fir is the real icon of B.C.

26 Sep 2016

US designates Vancouver company PacNet a ‘significant transnational criminal organization’
(via CBC News)

The U.S. Treasury Department has designated Vancouver-based company PacNet a “significant transnational criminal organization” as part of a crackdown on mail fraud.

26 Sep 2016

What can Al Gore’s first debate with George W. Bush teach Hillary Clinton?
(via the New York Times)

The October 2000 showdown was seen by some as a deciding factor in that presidential race. Our oral history reveals lessons for the 2016 Democratic nominee.

26 Sep 2016

Nahid Hattar, Jordan writer in blasphemy case, killed
(via BBC News)

A Jordanian writer charged with offending Islam after allegedly sharing a satirical cartoon on his Facebook page has been killed.

26 Sep 2016

Ontario town steams over Nestlé bid to control local spring water well
(via The Guardian)

A small town in Ontario, Canada, has prompted fresh scrutiny of the bottled-water industry after its attempt secure a long-term water supply through the purchase of a well was outbid by the food and drinks multinational Nestlé.

26 Sep 2016

Police seize Montreal reporter’s computer to find source for story
(via The Globe and Mail)

A Montreal journalist whose computer was seized by police after reporting on the alleged abusive behaviour of a judge did nothing wrong and broke no laws, said his managing editor on Thursday.

26 Sep 2016

Study finds air-quality issues in community surrounded by oilsands
(via The Globe and Mail)

A major study of air quality in a northern Alberta indigenous community surrounded by oilsands development suggests there is a chance ongoing exposure to airborne chemicals may be damaging people’s health.

26 Sep 2016

The Age of the Wordless logo: Why are today’s consumers so jaded about advertising?
(via The Atlantic)

MasterCard unveiled its new logo earlier this summer, and as far as rebrandings go, the tweaks were subtle: The company kept its overlapping red and yellow balls intact, and moved its name, which was previously front and center, to beneath the balls, while making the text lowercase.

26 Sep 2016

Three-hundred and seventy five top scientists warn of ‘real, serious, immediate’ climate threat...
(via The Guardian)

Yesterday, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, published an open letter regarding climate change.

22 Sep 2016

...While Obama warns of mass migrations if climate change is not confronted
(via Scientific American)

In his final U.N. address, the president says inaction will lead to more unrest.

22 Sep 2016

Vancouver empty homes tax to include units used for Airbnb
(via CBC News)

Vancouver’s proposed empty homes tax would include secondary properties being booked on the vacation rental website Airbnb, with the maximum fine for people who evade the levy set at $10,000.

22 Sep 2016

Why are Canadians being offered cash to abandon their homes?
(via Bloomberg)

Can six-figure payments persuade residents to move away from dying coastal villages?

22 Sep 2016

Trump and Clinton are getting ready for a 90-minute campaign
(via The New Yorker)

What may turn out to be the most important ninety minutes in America’s political history will unfold Monday night, at Hoftstra University, when Hillary Clinton, the former Secretary of State, and Donald J. Trump, the reality-show host and real-estate developer, meet for their first televised Presidential debate.

22 Sep 2016

Fact is stranger than fiction: Canadian Mint employee accused of smuggling $180K of gold in his rectum
(via the Ottawa Citizen)

An employee of the Royal Canadian Mint allegedly smuggled about $180,000 in gold from the fortress-like facility, possibly evading multiple levels of detection with a time-honoured prison trick.

22 Sep 2016

OECD cuts Canada’s economic growth forecast as global economy slows
(via the Toronto Star)

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development said weak trade and financial distortions are exacerbating slow global economic growth.

22 Sep 2016

Theresa May committed to introducing ‘Alan Turing law’ and pardon gay men convicted of ‘gross indecency’
(via The Independent)

Theresa May’s government is committed to introducing an “Alan Turing law” and will, in due course, pardon thousands of gay men convicted under historic gross indecency crimes.

22 Sep 2016

Canada scrambles to create national climate plan, but may sign COP21 without one
(via Common Dreams)

Canada’s approach to tackling climate change grows ever more confused as the federal government scrambles to sign the Paris climate accord in early November — without actually putting forth a national plan to limit the country’s soaring carbon emissions.

20 Sep 2016

Putin firms control with big win for Russia’s ruling party...
(via Reuters)

Vladimir Putin cemented his supremacy over Russia’s political system when his ruling United Russia party took three quarters of the seats in parliament in a weekend election, paving the way for him to run for a fourth term as president.

20 Sep 2016

...amid widespread claims of vote-rigging
(via The Daily Mail)

CCTV has emerged appearing to show an election official allegedly stuffing a pile of voting papers in to a ballot box in Russia. 

20 Sep 2016

US signals backing for self-driving cars
(via the New York Times)

Federal auto safety regulators on Monday made it official: They are betting the nation’s highways will be safer with more cars driven by machines and not people.

20 Sep 2016

CRTC to implement wholesale access to ultra fast fibre networks
(via Financial Post)

Canada’s telecom regulator will announce this week implementation plans for its controversial decision to require big players to sell wholesale access to their new, ultra-fast fibre networks.

20 Sep 2016

Tragically Hip tour raises more than $1M for brain cancer research
(via CBC News)

The Canadian Cancer Society and the Sunnybrook Foundation say the Tragically Hip's recent tour has raised more than $1 million for brain cancer research in Canada.

20 Sep 2016

Southern California Gas to pay $4-million settlement over massive Porter Ranch gas leak
(via the Los Angeles Times)

Southern California Gas Co. agreed to pay $4 million to settle criminal charges over the massive gas leak near Porter Ranch last year, but the utility still faces potentially costly civil actions from both residents and regulators.

20 Sep 2016

A back-to-school ABCs for activists
(via Social Science Space)

This ABCs by Professor Michelle Stack is to help activists strategize.

20 Sep 2016

Humanity driving ‘unprecedented’ marine extinction
(via The Guardian)

Humanity is driving an unprecedented extinction of sealife unlike any in the fossil record, hunting and killing larger species in a way that will disrupt ocean ecosystems for millions of years, scientists have found.

16 Sep 2016