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Life in the Gig Economy

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The “gig economy” promised independence and opportunity for employees. Instead, it’s delivered increasingly precarious work while making it harder to exercise basic employment rights guaranteed to workers in traditional jobs. This Tyee series digs into the rapid growth of businesses like Uber and Skip the Dishes, and wonders whether they’ve made life better or worse for workers, where they could lead, and what can be done to reform the industry.

In This Series

analysis

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Life in the Gig Economy: Good for Companies, Bad for Workers

New business models rely on stripping employees of their rights. First in a series.

Paul Willcocks, 1 Jan 2020


opinion

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Gig Life Is Lonely and Powerless

Uber and its followers promised autonomy and opportunity. Our findings show they delivered sadness and serfdom.

By Paul Glavin, Alex Bierman and Scott Schieman, 2 Jan 2020


opinion

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Gig Life: Slaves to the Algorithm

When the boss is an app, humans pay a price. Part of a series on the gig economy.

Shainaz Firfiray, 3 Jan 2020


culture

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From ‘One Shit Job to Another Shit Job’

A new film offers a bleak but accurate look at the struggle to get by in the world of precarious work. Part of a series.

Robert MacDonald, 6 Jan 2020


analysis

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Who Sticks up for the Gig Worker?

Not Canada’s governments. But California shows the way on wages and workplace standards. Last in a series.

Paul Willcocks, 7 Jan 2020


Real Cities Give Their People Places to Pee

Public washrooms should be plentiful and accessible, says one scholar. And cities that do flush, flourish.

By Christopher Cheung