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Tyee Books

Weekend Listening: 'Cold, Hungry and in the Dark'

A free audiobook chapter of Bill Powers' look at 'the natural gas supply myth.'

By Bill Powers 9 Nov 2013 | TheTyee.ca

Bill Powers is the editor of Powers Energy Investor and previously the editor of the Canadian Energy Viewpoint and US Energy Investor. He has been publishing investment research on the oil and gas industry since 2002 and sits on the Board of Directors of Calgary-based Arsenal Energy.

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Gas photo via Shutterstock.

The audiobook you are about to listen to is the first chapter of Bill Powers' Cold, Hungry and in the Dark: Exploding the Natural Gas Supply Myth. But before that, you'll hear a preface from petroleum geologist Arthur Berman.

Industry and government are spreading the good news about natural gas reserves, proclaiming natural gas to be an abundant and cheap resource with vast economic potential. Just this week the British Columbia government announced new estimations of the province's own supply, now putting it at 2,933 trillion cubic feet -- or enough to support development for more than 150 years. What are the implications of that scenario?

In Cold, Hungry and in the Dark, energy analyst and investor Bill Powers provides a history of the natural gas industry with an emphasis on the gas crisis of the 1970s, an analysis of natural gas supply sources, and a review of past and future natural gas demand. Powers demonstrates how the seeming glut of natural gas can very quickly become a shortage, and his book suggests ways to increase the reliability of data and the sustainability of the industry.

Thanks to friends at Post Hypnotic for allowing us to share this excerpt with you.  [Tyee]

Read more: Energy

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