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In Nerds We Trust

In Nerds We Trust

Family and friends turn to science communicators like me to make sense of a pandemic. Here’s what I learned about handling good and bad info in a crisis.

Josh Silberg
26 Mar 2020

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Get to the bottom of something big.

How The Tyee Is Covering COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic is all over the media. What does The Tyee seek to add?

Our legislative bureau chief Andrew MacLeod is tracking actions by the province. Contributing editors Crawford Kilian and Andrew Nikiforuk are providing wider context: where is the outbreak taking us and how did we get here?

All the Tyee’s team is now focused on the crisis, doubling our daily story output. Reporters Katie Hyslop, Chris Cheung, Moira Wyton and Amanda Follett Hosgood are working around the clock, complemented by other regular contributors and our new partnership with the team of Hakai Magazine.

To keep abreast, subscribe free to Tyee daily e-news, check this home page regularly, or bookmark the Tyee’s Coronavirus topic section.

Tyee Insider

What we're up to. How to be involved.

Say hello to The Tyee’s new virtual office

In-person gatherings are out, but the news never stops. The Tyee team has moved to a 100 per cent remote newsroom, settling into a new way of working while bringing you in-depth reporting updated throughout the day on the situation in B.C. during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We’re physically isolating, but keeping social through daily video calls. Pictured right is part of the Tyee team, calling in from our new home offices.

Clockwise from top left, culture editor Dorothy Woodend, publisher Jeanette Ageson, reporter Christopher Cheung, reporter Katie Hyslop, editorial assistant Olamide Olaniyan, practicum student Missy Johnson, editor David Beers, reporter Amanda Follett Hosgood and outreach manager Emma Cooper.


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Best ‘Work From Home’ practices
(click to read in context)

Having worked from home, I would suggest the following: set aside a specific place to work, if at all possible. The kitchen table (by location) may provide too many distractions. Avoid the non-computer distractions like the television. Unless you need for work, turn all the phones and non-work email accounts off.


Watch the diet! Working from home makes it easier to keep a balance diet, but, also enables bad diet decisions (like breakfast cereal three times a day). Higher-maintenance or demanding pets can be a challenge, as can small children. Being at home disrupts their routine, so, you may have to adjust your work schedule to fit their schedules better.




tflf, in response to The Tyee article “Working from Home, from a Writer Who’s Been There”

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Culture

In Nerds We Trust

In Nerds We Trust

Family and friends turn to science communicators like me to make sense of a pandemic. Here’s what I learned about handling good and bad info in a crisis.

Josh Silberg
26 Mar 2020
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